Everyday Should Be Christmas

          

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To say December 25th was the day Jesus Christ was born, may leave us in a tangled, rough and tumble argument where no rules apply. History convincingly shows that December 25th was popularized the date for Christmas, not because Christ was born on that day, but because it was already popular in pagan religious celebrations as the birthday of the sun. Infact, there is virtually no knowing as to the particular date Christ was born. Whether Christ was born on the 25th of December or not, of the essence to us is not only that he was born, but, the reason behind his nativity.        

Jesus’ life on earth was a template to mankind, a showpiece to all. He lived and practised what He taught. Even on the Lords’ Day where stringent adherence to the tenets of the Sabbath were prime, He did not reserve or withhold heavenly virtues nor tangible benefits for a special day as the Pharisees and Sadducees would do. He healed the blind man at the pool, ate with sinners on the Sabbath, wrought wad of miracles as long as their faith could take, never for once deprecating them nor bid them farewell till the Sabbath day.                          

As gilded as Jesus’ qualities were; the qualities of not holding tight-fistedly to possessions, food, materials et cetera till a special occasion, some Christians who claim to take after Christ have preferably chosen to see a neighbor in need, cruise pass them, afterwards, on the day of Christmas, Easter and even Sunday services, generously give out the goodies. Probably, because we are more concerned with the day He was born, than the reason for His birth that we treat everyday as no day and special occasions as special days. Had Jesus lived the latter life, Christianity would have lost it’s salt and it’s foundation- love, would have been a difficult virtue to exude by mere mortals. I am not against people who give on Christmas day. I am simply forwarding a poser, that of what essence is Christianity, one principally based on sacrificial love to a Christian who gives as a life style on any day and to another whose giving is gudgeoned by seasonal changes? It goes further downhill the irony of the December 25th, that inasmuchas some persons have designed the day as their special day of giving, others, under the joys of the yuletide, hike up the prices of food as their own special day of taking.        

Why must the reason for Jesus’ birth, lead to a hike in food prices? Why must one neglect one’s neighbor already straitened or poverty-strickened with the frequent intake of garri and salt on a day aside a special day? Why will one need to refurbish and spring clean his house just for a special occasion and not do same on a ordinary day whence necessary? Why must one purchase a Toyota Highlander Jeep to suit an occasion, and probably have to cry the day it is accidented?                                  

If one can do anything on a normal day as he would ordinarily do on a special day, one may not feel blenched the day he loosely parts with that thing. The 365 days and for a leap year, 366 days in a year, was given equal prominence by God that’s why we would never see a day longer than a night and a night, a day. So, where the mentality was developed that some days be treated better than the other, is somewhat atavistic to divinity an humanity. As we celebrate the reason for Jesus’ birth, let us never reserve anything for a special occasion for everyday is a special occasion. It’s up to you to decide.

Merry Christmas.
-DAVIDSON .I. OBABUEKI

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7 thoughts on “Everyday Should Be Christmas

  1. Nyc message…..tanks for identifying PAGAN ORIGIN OF CHRISMAS…Y DEN ….
    ALLEGED CHRISTIANS STILL XELEBRATE IT ..
    IS A disgruntling QUESTION….
    NYCE VIEWPOINT DAVIDSON…
    U SEEM TO HAVE SURPASSED OUR COLLECTIVE IMAGINATION…d sky is ur starting point
    KEEP D GUD WORK ..
    .MY BROTHER.

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  2. Christians that celebrate christmas as a special day know what they are doing in the sense that they use that in reaching out to the less priviledge ones more specially but that doesn’t mean they don’t give out on ordinary day

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  3. But, not all Christians who celebrate Christmas as a special day and give out to the less privileged on that day, well extend same munificency to ordinary days. I can agree with you that some Christians give not only on Christmas, but, on ordinary days too. But, I disagree if you say Christians without qualifying it as ‘all’ or ‘some’ that give on a special day like Christmas and ordinary days. Thanks all the way Mr. Babatunde, your opinion is saluted.

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  4. True, everyday should be Christmas but like a virus that has been allowed freedom to thrive for centuries, everyday can’t be Christmas…

    Outrightly, the season shouldn’t stimulate the need for us to share but a greater need to love and share ‘more’ as we have been doing normally every other day of the year ( Like Mr Ojo mentioned)but then, the significance of these ‘Special days’ does create a genuine sense of love in our hearts and its most logical that we would be obliged to do more than we would normally.

    This, in its own right is not perfectly right, neither is it outrightly wrong…

    Excellent point of view however Sir…. Many seem to forget even the sheer significance of our Saviour’s death…

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  5. True, everyday should be Christmas but like a virus that has been allowed freedom to thrive for centuries, everyday can’t be Christmas…

    Outrightly, the season shouldn’t stimulate the need for us to share but a greater need to love and share ‘more’ as we have been doing normally every other day of the year ( Like Mr Ojo mentioned)but then, the significance of these ‘Special days’ does create a genuine sense of love in our hearts and its most logical that we would be obliged to do more than we would normally.

    This, in its own right is not perfectly right, neither is it outrightly wrong…

    Excellent point of view however Sir…. Many seem to forget even the sheer significance of our Saviour’s death…

    Like

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